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The Last Tinker: City of Colors Review

The Last Tinker: City of Colors is a mottled blur of mechanics done better in other games. Brightly painted backdrops and a creatively rich world lay a thick primer of promise on the canvas, but as you grow familiar with the automated platforming and raise an eyebrow to the stuttering framerate, the jagged brushstrokes begin to show. The story and surrounding visual elements carry their fair share of charm, but a ho-hum combat system paired with lackluster puzzles drag down this otherwise imaginative experience.

Tinkerworld is colorful, but the gameplay can be drab in comparison.

From the start, it's clear that The Last Tinker is trying to mimic the best '90s platformers. The expressive characters chirp and tut as they speak, harking back to classics like Banjo-Kazooie, while the anamorphic protagonist would fit in with a crowd of nimble mascots from generations past. Tinkerworld is coated with reds, blues, and greens that make you question if you should adjust your TV's contrast, and you can't take more than five steps without stumbling into a pyramid of boxes begging to be punched.

The Last Tinker has the superficial trappings of those successful 3D platformers, but lacks elegance in its execution. Instead of giving you the ability to jump from ridge to ridge manually, The Last Tinker presents equidistant platforms that you can cross by simply running forward. Correct timing is often necessary, as floating boxes or scalable tentacles might submerge if you're too slow. However, there's little challenge associated with traversing the environment. Seamlessly swinging across canyons looks like a thrill, but the short-lived excitement that goes along with the weighty sense of movement isn't enough to replace the satisfaction of landing a well-timed jump. The combat doesn't fare much better, as rudimentary combinations that require little more than simple button mashing are often the easiest solution to the busy encounters. Purchasable upgrades and additional abilities earned through story progress spice up an otherwise elementary system, but there just isn't much here to sink your teeth into.

Despite its artistic aptitude, The Last Tinker lacks identity.

Beyond punching, dodging, and countering, your hairy hero can cause enemies to run away in fear, as well as stun them for a short period of time to provide openings for finishing blows. Stringing your strikes together by dashing from target to target can lead to fleeting fun, but once you're in the thick of the action, the paltry framerate disrupts your flow. The Last Tinker struggles to deliver a smooth experience even in its quieter moments; just walking across an empty street can cause the game to stutter annoyingly. These instances are manageable, but the busier sections consistently bend the game toward its breaking point.

The technical failings are a shame, since the prismatic scenery can be truly dazzling when it's presented at a steady clip. Tinkerworld is coated in color, with each district supporting a particular shade. The red, green, and blue districts all have their own styles and unique citizens, and while they were once able to coexist, color-based prejudices have drawn sharp lines between the groups. The sudden outbreak of bleakness that leaves previously vibrant locations windswept quiets the bickering, but it's really up to the hero Koru to bring the guardian spirits of each district together against a common enemy.

The game is evocative of '90s platformers, although never reaches the heights of some of the best from that era.

It's predictable, but cute. The Last Tinker never surprises you with its dialogue or plot points, but the story is a satisfactory complement to the visual flair. It's just a shame that the actual interactive part of the game never goes beyond being adequate. When you're not punching or jumping, you're often faced with dull puzzles that have you guiding a dopish mushroom creature from place to place. The additional powers you unlock over time give you a wider range of interactions with this companion, and that leads to more varied and complex riddles. Still, none of the puzzles are too demanding, and you'll often find that the greater challenge comes from keeping the mushroom at your side rather than discovering the solution.

Despite its artistic aptitude, The Last Tinker lacks identity. The combat is remedial, the platforming is robotic, and the puzzles are little more than frustrating roadblocks that fail to mystify. The florid environments you'll jump through give Koru's journey a hint of personality, but the medley of tired, unpolished mechanics come together to form a forgettable, shapeless package.

Velocity 2X Review

Velocity 2X is interactive poetry. All of its pieces, all of its movements, all of its systems and mechanics flow seamlessly into and out of one another to create a constant tone of movement and a feeling of endless flow. A mistimed jump, a poorly placed shot, and even death are merely delays--brief hurdles in your pursuit of a perfect run. Velocity's influences--Metroid, Mario, and countless classic shoot-em-ups--are clear from the outset. Molding such disparate genres together isn't easy, but Velocity is a tight and focused experience with a stunning level of finesse.

At any given point you could be at the helm of a blazing-fast ship equipped with the ability to teleport anywhere within a lever, or you could be running around as protagonist Kai, whose resemblance to Metroid's Samus Aran is more than just a passing one. Shortly after Velocity 2X's opening, Kai undergoes numerous cybernetic experiments that bestow upon her an extraordinary set of abilities. The game lacks a complex or gritty narrative, but Kai's arc as a protagonist is nonetheless a sympathetic one. She regularly flashes between aggressive, sassy, humorous, and even nostalgic moods, and prismatic artwork reinforces that broad emotional spectrum. Cel-shading and clever lighting give Kai and the world she inhabits a palpable sense of weight and presence. Velocity 2X pulls heavily from its 2D inspirations, but adds distinct visual layers that give the environments depth. That flair effectively communicates both the emotional context for any given scene and highlights key obstacles to you so that you can maintain momentum without getting lost in a morass of visual information.

Bombs can be fired in all directions, and they don't hurt you. The effects do look gorgeous, though.

Early stages introduce each gameplay mechanic separately so that you can familiarize yourself with how Velocity 2X works. Later, once you've mastered individual techniques, the game twists its ideas together in ways that keep the experience consistently fresh. The smooth layering of mechanics is one of Velocity 2X's finest attributes, nuanced to such a degree that it takes an entire campaign to move from “comfortable” to “fluent” with all of its mechanics. As a result, the entire game serves as its own tutorial, and subsequent runs provide a masterful degree of challenge. Each stage is an incremental step up in difficulty that then loops back to subsequent play throughs. Perfectly finishing an early level is substantially harder than merely completing a later, an approach that makes keeps you growing and learning each time you play. The unfortunate side effect of that approach is that the finale lacks the appropriate thematic climax. Tension is constantly ratcheted higher and higher, but there's no conclusive release--just another loop.

The first few areas teach basic ship movement; from there, Velocity 2X folds in its unique brand of lightning-fast teleportation, which provides a novel way to move throughout your environment. Walls cease to be barriers as you zip from place to place effortlessly, charting a new kind of course. Zipping about in this manner does take some getting used to, and you might feel at first as though you are haphazardly bouncing around. Starting a jump requires careful aiming, and when you're racing through a new section, it's easy to get sloppy and accidentally kill yourself. Fortunately, death is never a big deal: you respawn quickly, losing little more than a second or two most of the time. Even in these early moments, however, the harsh sound of a warp and the smooth animation make these micro-jumps consistently satisfying. On the second, third, or fourth time through, you'll have become familiar enough with the area to rapidly plan and calculate safe (if imprecise) warps, and will have grown to appreciate Velocity 2X's forgiving aiming system, which favors snaps of the analog stick over meticulous targeting. Later levels, which are even more loaded with environmental dangers, have you playing as Kai on foot. In such levels, teleportation works only at set distances for each of the four cardinal directions, which keeps the action-platforming from becoming unnecessarily lethal. Once you have unlocked the game's full array of leaps and dashes, it becomes an elegant endeavor full of opportunities for slick maneuvers and deft timing.

After the pieces have been introduced and tested in controlled environments, Velocity 2X starts combining them in increasingly complex sequences with longer, sometimes labyrinthine challenges. Telepods allow you to set up long range warp points, and they facilitate puzzles that have you completing certain parts of the task at hand before flashing back to the beginning to take an alternate route. It's a brilliant system that creates controlled bursts of backtracking without the monotony that too often follows in other games. In one level, “The Labyrinth,” you must set up these points across the map and warp between them repeatedly as you unlock new zones. This process may sound slow and tedious, but teleportation is integrated so smoothly that Velocity 2X never stumbles and always maintains its focus on speed and momentum.

That constant pressure to move forward and be faster creates moments in which you must quickly weigh the risks of one approach versus another. When on foot, for example, you can't dash and use your arm cannon at once, but you still have access to a rifle that can only fire left or right. As a result, you are forced to sacrifice speed for protection (or vice versa), putting yourself in danger so that you might move just a bit faster. Similarly, while in the ship, your boost pushes the entire map upwards. Maintaining top speed can catch you on ledges that appear as the screen continues to scroll, and the tradeoff provides enough emergent variety to keep levels fresh on subsequent playthroughs. Velocity 2X's exceptional locomotion and omnipresent timer make the traditional act of shooting things in video games newly thrilling.

A mistimed jump, a poorly placed shot, and even death are merely delays--brief hurdles in your pursuit of a perfect run.

Velocity 2X is meant to keep you rushing ahead, and every individual mechanic reinforces that sense of momentum. Death isn't a mark of failure. Shifting between story and play isn't marked by an abrupt change in background music. Fractions of a second separate ship combat from platforming. Sleek animations and consistent frame rates visually echo the motif. You can shift seamlessly between the PS4 and the Vita, and Velocity 2X is just as gorgeous and just as fluid on both. There's never a dropped beat, never a moment where you aren't moving, and never a point at which you aren't considering how to be even faster.

IFA 2014: Samsung Gear VR headset will give you Note 4-powered virtual reality

IFA 2014: Samsung Gear VR headset will give you Note 4-powered virtual reality

The Samsung Gear VR has been officially announced, and as expected it's a virtual reality headset accessory that uses the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 as its display.

As one of this year's more out-there announcements, the Gear VR is a virtual reality headset onto which you attach your phone.

The Samsung Gear VR is designed for use with the Galaxy Note 4. The phone clips onto the front of the Gear VR headset, providing the display that would otherwise add substantially to the cost of the thing.

What the Samsung Gear VR does provide are the lenses that make the screen seem like it's further than a half-inch away from your corneas.

Predictably enough, given your eye effectively gets half of the Note 4's screen to itself, the Gear VR is able to deliver stereoscopic 3D, which is where independent images are delivered to each eye.

Jumping on the Oculus bandwagon

Samsung has managed to snag itself 'powered by Oculus' status for the Gear VR, which means that it uses software produced by the guys over at Oculus VR. Exactly what this will get buyers longer-term remains to be seen, though.

Whether a cheap way to find VR nirvana or a naff phone accessory, the Samsung Gear VR does offer a pretty compelling excuse for the ridiculously high pixel density of QHD phones.

Because, let's be honest, to tell the difference normally you'd have to get so close you risk making your eyes explode.








IFA 2014: Lenovo doubles down on gaming with Y70 Touch laptop, Erazer X315 desktop

IFA 2014: Lenovo doubles down on gaming with Y70 Touch laptop, Erazer X315 desktop

Joining in on the PC gaming craze that grows more mainstream every day, Lenovo announced two new devices that are ready to push pixels. Following in the footsteps of the company's seemingly successful “Y” line of gaming laptops is its first 17-inch gaming laptop, the Lenovo Y70 Touch.

Nigh identical in almost every regard (other than size) to the Lenovo Y50, the Y70 Touch comes sporting up to an Intel Core i7 processor and Nvidia GeForce GTX 860M graphics chip. And, as the name implies, the notebook houses a 17-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 touchscreen.

Rounding out the spec sheet on this rig is up to 16GB of DDR3L memory and either a hard drive (with SSD cache) as large as 2TB or up to a 256GB SSD. All that comes packed in a chassis that weighs less than 7.5 pounds, according to Lenovo, making it lighter than most laptops in its class.

As early as this October, you can get this stylish, JBL audio-pumping mobile gaming rig starting at $1,299 (about £788, AU$1,399). That's not bad for a 17-incher, but let's just hope that screen gets a serious boost after what the Y50 had to show.

Pining for the PC

Lenovo Erazer X315

Lenovo wants you to know that it loves gaming hardware, so much so that it's introducing another addition to its lineup of gaming desktop PCs: the Erazer X315. Pegged as a gaming rig for those on a budget, the X315 packs AMD R9 graphics and quad-core processing power.

To store all of those Steam Sale games that you're never going to play, you can equip the X315 with a 2TB hard drive with solid-state cache. Better yet, the mid-sized system supports 7.1 channel audio to easily fit into an existing setup.

The chassis in question has a medieval look to it, similar to the existing X510 case, and houses four USB 3.0 ports and support for up to 12GB of RAM. The touch-to-open port cover on the front panel also reveals a hidden air vent to keep the system cool while gaming.

Following the Y70's release, the Erazer X315 will land this November starting at a fine $599 (around £363, AU$645). That's not much more than your Xbox One or PS4 for something that can do a whole lot more.

Burning up the budget tablet wars

Tablets are used for gaming more than anything – one look at any app store will tell you as much. With the prices for Android tablets hitting rock bottom and their quality only rising, Lenovo opted to stake its claim with the Lenovo Tab S8.

Lenovo Tab S8

Displaying Android 4.4 KitKat behind an 8-inch, 1,920 x 1,200 One Glass Solution touchscreen, the Tab S8 sports a super slim profile – just 0.65 pounds heavy and 0.31 inches thin, to be exact. Under the hood is a quad-core, 1.3GHz Intel Atom Z3745 processor, 2GB of memory and 16GB of storage. And don't forget about Bluetooth 4.0 and LTE data (optional).

The slate houses two front-facing speakers, not to mention a 1.6MP webcam up front. Around back is an 8MP shooter with a f2.2 wide aperture lens. The Tab S8 is available this month starting at just $199 (about £120, AU$214).

  • Keep up with all the latest IFA 2014 highlights right here







Sponsored: TechRadar Tip Off: Just in time for Halloween, win a giant brain from GamesRadar

Sponsored: TechRadar Tip Off: Just in time for Halloween, win a giant brain from GamesRadar

They say a brain is a beautiful thing to waste and since two brains are better than one, we here at TechRadar want to help you bring home a spooky noggin' in time for the holidays.

Our sister site GamesRadar has teamed up with the horror-ble team at Bethesda to bring to life a replica brain from the upcoming survival game The Evil Within. The best (or worst) part? It can be all yours.

To enter, all you need to do is download The Evil Within photo app on either Google Play or the iTunes App Store, and submit a picture of yourself sporting the signature barbed-wire. Don't do the smartphone thing? Check out The Evil Within's Facebook app for other ways to enter.

Oh, and you might want to get a move on – the contest ends frighteningly soon.








Updated: 50 best Android games 2014: our top picks

Updated: 50 best Android games 2014: our top picks

Best Android games: 1-8

While the 'free-to-play' market has taken a bit of a beating of late due to gamers falling out of love with the use of in-app payments, the world of mobile gaming is still an exciting one.

Whether you want games that will last the length of a commute, or want to be lost in a port of GTA where you spend hours mowing down pedestrians and making money out of murder, there is a game on here for you.

This constantly updated list is a mixture of free and paid for games, and also that one in between - some in-app payments aren't really that bad. Honest! If by the end you think we have missed something special off of the list, let us know and we will see if it is worthy of inclusion further down the line.

1. Dots (free)

Proving the notion that simpler is better on mobile, Dots is stupidly, almost patronisingly simple, with players just drawing lines between coloured dots. Link them up and, as coloured things tend to do in games, they disappear, So more fall in. And it carries on like this, getting more and more compulsive as you chase bigger and better dot combos.

2. The Simpsons Tapped Out (free)

The Simpsons Tapped Out

EA's game based on the inhabitants of Springfield is surprising in a few ways. It's free, which is quite the thing, plus, although what many would deride as a 'freemium' game, it's more than possible to keep it going in the background, pottering away, slowly unlocking all of its content for free. Free-to-play done right, for once.

3. Angry Birds Space (free)

Angry Birds Space

Developer Rovio has done quite a lot of aggressive whoring of the Angry Birds franchise, but this space-based fork of the simplistic physics game series is really worth a try. For one, it introduces some new play concepts, with the planet-based levels requiring different tactics, plus the puzzles generally need a bit more of a thoughtful approach than the chuck-it-and-see of the originals.

4. Badland (free)

Badland

Has a bit of an 'indie' vibe about it this one, with Badland offering a weird, dark and gloomy world, in which you fly about in control of a… blob thing. Your blob gets bigger and smaller, splits into loads of mini clones, and generally baffles you about what might lie around the next corner. We like a bit of a surprise, and this is full of them.

5. Crazy Taxi City Rush (free)

Crazy Taxi City Rush

Crazy Taxi City Rush is another free game in which you need to put "free" in big quote marks, as it's packed to bursting with subsequent in-app purchases to unlock features, buy customisations and, in a particularly shameless move, buy petrol for your taxi to continue playing after more than a handful of failed runs. Still, endure the cash-grab and it's a pretty game, one that uses a new, simple, swipe-based control system to allow it all to work surprisingly well on a touchscreen.

6. Monument Valley (£2.49, $3.99, $AU4.90)

A very, very pretty game, this. Monument Valley is based around the weird sort of impossible geometric shapes popularised by artist M. C. Escher, with its colourful maps bending and rotating in ways that appear to defy the laws of nature. You walk on walls, flip them, turn them into floors, avoid crows and marvel at how beautiful it all looks. A short game with only 10 multi-layered levels, but a joyful ride.

7. PewPew (free)

PewPew

The developer calls this a "multidirectional shoot them up" presumably because describing it as a "Geometry Wars clone" might have got him in a bit of legal trouble. Regardless of its origin, it's a superb shooter with some bizarre game modes and controls that work exceptionally well on touch devices.

8. Modern Combat 5: Blackout (£4.99, $6.99, $AUD8.99)

Modern Combat 5

We get moaned at a lot for putting too many silly, quirky little games about shapes and animals and organising letters of the alphabet in this list. So here's one about men with guns shooting each other in 3D. Modern Combat 5 the latest in Gameloft's mobile homage to grown-up home console FPS franchises, in which you gun about the place alone or in online multiplayer matches. Nice to see Gameloft offering everything in a one-off install here, rather than packing it with in-app purchases.

Best Android games: 9-21

9. Plague Inc (free)

Plague Inc

A really enjoyable and tough strategy game, in which you play some sort of evil god intent on crushing all of mankind. You do this by developing viruses, which spread through the air, water or human contact, gradually wiping out countries, continents and, if the wind's literally blowing in the right direction, everyone.

10. Whale Trail Frenzy (free)

Whale Trail Frenzy

No one dies of disease in Whale Trail. It's a sweet flying sim, which sees you float about in the clouds having a lovely time, collecting things, boosting and generally being quite happy about it. The cheery vibe is broken a bit when adverts and in-app purchase requests pop up, but it's happy enough before the money men turn up.

11. Thomas Was Alone (£3.99, $5.99, $AUD9.99)

Thomas Was Alone

One of the PC "indie" world's big name smashes has arrived on Android, with the existential platform game yours to... enjoy. Or at least attempt to understand. You could call Thomas Was Alone a "platform game" if you wanted to be mean and disrespectful, but it's more about offering an atmospheric and thoughtful journey through an abstract world. A bit like a piece of art, but let's not get into that debate here. I'm not being paid by the word.

12. Bad Piggies (free)

Bad Piggies

Angry Birds maker Rovio proves it's not a one-trick bird-pony with this, a bizarre and quirky physics game. You have a toolbox at your disposal, used to build a flying and/or driving machine, which then has to trundle its way through a level. It's silly, but at least attempts to shove out some new ideas.

13. Pocket Planes (free)

Pocket Planes

An extremely clever and enjoyable miniature strategy game that has you taking control of a small airline and attempting to ramp up customer numbers. It starts out with a few simple freight runs before you expand the fleet, open up new routes and generally get a bit panicked about how many people are depending on you for their holidays.

14. Radiant Defense (free)

Radiant Defense

The tower defense genre is heaving on Android, thanks to the poke and press play mechanics being ideally suited to touchscreen play. Radiant Defense is a great example of the simplified strategy concept, presenting its war action in a futuristic neon style that looks awesome on any phone with the grunt to do it justice.

15. Pocket League Story 2 (free)

Pocket League Story 2

Kariosoft's made a big thing for itself by using its management style of game across various scenarios, with this sporting event being one of the best. You take control of a club, then stress about signings, money, tactics and more. It's slightly robbed of some fun via a desire to use in-app purchases to squeeze money out of players, ironically mirroring the state of the game it takes inspiration from.

16. New Star Soccer (free)

A great football management game that has a bit of a sense of humour about itself. There's some turn-based play, but it's more about bringing together the off-pitch lifestyles of players with the crucial money matters of the football universe. Like Pocket League Story there are some in-app cash demands, so prepare to be badgered for payments after you've progressed some way through.

Tiny Death Star, Sonic Dash, Cut The Rope Time Travel

17. Star Wars: Tiny Death Star (free)

An absolutely gorgeous pixel-art recreation of the Star Wars universe, in which players embrace the dark side and go to work creating Death Stars to please the man in black. A massive challenge, made even more massive should you choose to play it without resorting to taking the shortcut of paying real money for in-game cash.

18. Sonic Dash (free)

There is some arguing as to whether this is "free" as it's rammed with in-app purchases, but there's no dispute as to its quality. Sonic's latest mobile game is, appropriately, an endless runner, with the hedgehog jumping left and right to avoid obstacles placed around its familiar green worlds.

19. Cut the Rope: Time Travel (free)

The weird little physics game is one of Android's most popular franchises, with this update introducing a few new tricks and weapons. It's the same sort of experience as its earlier chapters, though, with players swinging ropes to throw sweeties around its colourful screens. Masses of levels and a mid-to-high fun level.

20. QuizUp (free)

QuizUp is a staggeringly clever online pub quiz app, where you play with random strangers or friends. You can pick from a massive amount of categories, from riddles to sports through to Adventure Time, so you won't be caught out by subjects you don't know. Its simple quiz rounds only take a couple of minutes to get through, plus there's a seamless offline challenge option so you can mentally battle people who then take their turn later. It's loaded with questions and constantly updated with new categories. A real treat.

Best Android games: 21-33

21. Beach Buggy Blitz (free)

Beach Buggy Blitz

Offers something approaching big console quality on Android, in a game rammed with pretty worlds, loads of vehicles, power-ups, upgrades and more, plus the graphics engine can adapt to more powerful hardware and throws in more effects if you're using something with a serious number of cores. There is some level of in-app purchasing on offer, but it's mild and easily avoidable.

22. Toca Pet Doctor (£1.99, $2.99, $AUD3.99)

Toca Pet

If you let your device be held by a child, get Toca Pet Doctor on there to keep it amused and stop it inadvertently liking the wrong people while exploring Tinder. Developer Toca Boca promises not to stick in-app purchases in its titles so there's no worry about that, or even seeing any adverts, plus this simple veterinary game is a charmer. You put plasters on sick animals, get flies out of their tummies and more. It's very loveable.

23. Voxel Rush (free)

Voxel Rush

A very pretty and minimalist racer, where the usual beach/mountain/lava environments have been binned in favour of bold slabs of colour. It's stylish, motion controlled, ready for multiplayer action and integrates Google Play Game support for solo achievements and leaderboards.

24. Nightbird Trigger X (free)

Nightbird Trigger X

What the developer calls a "point shooting game," Nightbird Trigger X is a one-button pony where your little man has to shoot a point in the screen to progress. But there's stuff in the way. Annoying moving stuff, that means you score less and take longer if you can't find the target with your first bullet. Simple, but free and a little bit original.

25. Re-Volt 2: Multiplayer (free)

Re-Volt 2

Old-ish people who played the original Re-Volt race series on the games hardware of yesteryear will be bang up for this, even though it looks a little rough around the edges. Re-Volt 2: Multiplayer is a refresh of the radio-controlled car racer, now updated with multiplayer options for the sociable modern player. Free to download and get going, with only some unlockables masked by an in-app purchase requirement.

Spaceteam, Toast Time, Ridiculous Fishing

26. Spaceteam (free)

This is bonkers. Spaceteam uses the Android hardware to the max to build a properly innovative multiplayer-only game, where between two and four players come together to shout exciting space terminology at each other while battling the control panel of an exploding ship. It's very silly, like something that only came out on the Wii in Japan.

27. Toast Time (£1.99, US$2.99, AU$1.28)

If it needs pigeon-holing, Toast Time is best described as a combat platform game. Thing is, you're only a toaster, and your weapon is… toast. So it's sort of a toast-based physics simulation as well, with the kickback from the toast knocking the toaster around the screen and requiring constant compensation. Because there's a clock that needs protecting and… it's best you play it. It's good.

28. Ridiculous Fishing (£1.99, US$2.99, AU$3.68)

Quite possibly one of the best uses of the mobile phone accelerometer tech there's ever been, this, with motion control sending your fishing line down to the depths of the sea while you avoid fish. Then, on the way up, it's how you catch them. That's when it goes ridiculous, as the fisherman chucks them up in the air -- and you shoot them to bank the money. Silly, but a must play.

29. Super Hexagon (£1.99, US$2.99, AU$3.68)

Super Hexagon

Another mobile classic. Super Hexagon has two controls -- rotate left and rotate right. That's all you need to navigate the endless maze that spins out of the screen, in one of the mobile world's hardest, coolest, best-sounding and most moreish games. We order you to buy it. You literally have to.

30. Threes! (£1.20, US$1.99, AU$2.40)

The sort of silly maths game you might've played in your head before mobile phones emerged to absorb all our thought processes, Threes! really does take less than 30 seconds to learn. You bash numbers about until they form multiples of three and disappear. That's it. There are stacks of free clones available, but if you won't spare the price of one massive bar of chocolate to pay for a lovely little game like this that'll amuse you for week, you're part of the problem and deserve to rot in a freemium hell where it costs 50p to do a wee.

31. Minecraft Pocket Edition (£4.99, US$6.99, AU$9.25)

Minecraft Pocket Edition

The build 'em up phenomenon works brilliantly well on Android, thanks to the creator of the desktop original taking the time to do it justice. It's a slimmed down interface you see here with on-screen buttons, but the basics are all in and the Survival and Creative modes are ready for play -- as is multiplayer mode over Wi-Fi.

32. Heroes of Loot (£1.72, US$1.99, AU$3.30)

Heroes of Loot

The entire back catalogue of solo indie creator OrangePixel is worth exploring, but his latest is the best yet. It's a stylish 2D dungeon explorer, with masses of quests, classes and secret areas to unlock. Plus it supports a wide range of Bluetooth controllers, for easier play if you've got a compatible lump of buttoned plastic.

33. Flight Control (£0.60, US$0.99, AU$1.20)

Flight Control

An exciting new genre all of its own when it appeared, Flight Control created the world of the top-down air traffic control simulator. Literally three million times more exciting than it sounds, it's played by swiping 2D aeroplanes into runway landing slots, avoiding collisions and scoring for successful landings. Perfectly suited to touchscreen play.

Best Android games: 34-50

34. Pac-Man Championship Edition (£2.60, US$3.99, AU$5.00)

Pac-Man Championship Edition

Not just the same old Pac-Man that's been emulated, re-released and cloned for the last 30 years. Pac-Man CE is a fresh reworking of the maze game, with jazzy graphics, scrolling mazes and pumping sounds updating the concept for the kids of today. And the dads of today. Anyone after a really smart puzzle game, in fact.

35. Game Dev Story (£1.60, US$2.50, AU$3.00)

Game Dev Story, Raiden Legacy, Division Cell

The "Story" that started Kairosoft's domination of the simplistic business world sim, Game Dev Story sees you take charge of a software house and attempt to create a smash game. The sweet pixel-art characters then battle with the complexities of design and the stresses of arbitrary internet reviews from people who haven't even played it (ahem), in the pursuit of a money-making smash.

36. Raiden Legacy (£4.45, US$4.99, AU$10.00)

Quite possibly the greatest 2D shoot 'em up of all time, the Android conversion of Radien is every bit as impressive as the original. A choice of control schemes, display and difficulty settings make it a little more manageable on touchscreens, plus, seeing as this is the Legacy edition, you get Raiden, Raiden Fighters, Raiden Fighters 2 and Raiden Fighters Jet.

37. Pointless - Quiz with Friends (£1.49, US$2.48, AU$2.80)

The bafflingly popular TV series has its own official app based around the UK version of the show, complete with cartoon effigies of its two 'Jeeves and Wooster' style hosts. Facebook integration means you can play cross-platform with friends or just spend 7.5 hours a day playing it at work. Although it can be guilty of repeating questions and categories, there's still enough content in here to waste masses of everyone's precious lives.

38. Football Manager Handheld 2014 (£6.99, US$9.99, AU$12.00)

Football Manager Handheld 2014

Explodes through the usual Android game price ceiling by charging £6.99, but, in this case, it's worth it. The full app offers a superb, stats-heavy mobile take on the classic management series, hardly skimping on any minute detail in the transition to mobile. Manage transfers, the media, match days and more in one of the sporting gamers' must-get titles.

39. Canabalt HD (£1.99, US$2.99, AU$3.68)

Canabalt HD

The newer, slightly posher version of the original game, the one that pretty much invented the "endless runner" genre that now clogs up the gaming sections of the app stores of the world. You are a man. You run along rooftops to a techno soundtrack. That's about it, only it's much more enjoyable than it sounds.

40. Another World (£1.70, US$1.99, AU$3.49)

Another World

The classic 2D puzzle platformer that wowed the simpler folk of the 1990s with the very occasional bit of 3D, has arrived in perfect form on Android. This 20th anniversary edition has the original graphics plus the option of an HD refresh, but what's really about is getting to play one of gaming's most loved classics. On your phone. For a couple of quid. Madness.

41. GTA Vice City (£2.99, US$4.99, AU$5.53)

GTA: Vice City

Seem to remember people thought this was quite good. For the price of a pint (if you're somewhere northern) you can own one of the largest and most highly-rated video games of all time, to pop in and out of on your mobile phone. On-screen controls are never going to suit a game like this, but they are at least fully customisable -- so you can get it how you like it.

42. Terraria (£3.14, US$4.99, AU$5.70)

Terraria

Sort of a Minecraft… platform… puzzle 'em up, Terraria players dig and mine and fight their way through randomly generated worlds. Resources make weapons and houses, weapons and houses mean you stay alive, plus there's Wi-Fi multiplayer support that has it nearing parity with the version sold on desktops.

43. Sonic The Hedgehog 2 (£1.99, US$2.99, AU$3.68)

Sonic the Hedgehog 2

Not the easiest thing to play using on-screen buttons, but the fact this exists at all is a marvel. It's also a glorious conversion, with Sega finally taking the time to do the best Sonic justice. It's been remastered into widescreen and supports a wide range of Bluetooth controllers so, even if you don't yet own one, you'll be able to enjoy it fully when you eventually do.

44. Osmos HD (£1.79, US$2.99, AU$3.45)

Osmos HD

A lovely little ambient puzzle thing, in which you play a cell thing and make it your business to absorb others. The residue you fire out makes you smaller, though, so efficient use of your biological systems is a must. It's a chillout experience more than a game, with the surreal concept joined by some equally relaxing ambient music. A charmer.

45. Colin McRae Rally (£1.49, US$1.99, AU$2.80)

Cars. Cars going round corners and sometimes down straight bits. That's what you get here, in this nice looking recreation of the old PlayStation race favourite. On Android, Colin McRae lets users race four cars including Colin's classic Ford Focus, cars you get to smash around 30 separate race stages. Based on the beloved Colin McRae Rally 2.0 from the PS2, you really can't go wrong.

46. Broken Sword: Director's Cut (£3.99, US$4.99, AU$6.58)

Broken Sword: Director's Cut

This cult classic from an earlier wave of the big home consoles has been converted beautifully to Android, capturing the slightly odd and amusing adventure perfectly - and with an interface that really works on today's touchscreens. It's an "indie" game from before there were indie games, silly and with some excellent and challenging puzzles.

47. Worms 2: Armageddon (£2.99, US$4.99, AU$0.99)

Worms 2: Armageddon

Very old and very good, the Worms series led the way when it came to making strategy games fun. The comedy combat action is turn-based, with players alternating at having pop shots at each other with their weaponry. This slower pace means it's ideal for online and local multiplayer, as the odd glitch doesn't ruin the experience.

48. Baldur's Gate Enhanced Edition (£6.99, US$9.99, AU$13.99)

Best Android Games

The strategy titan has a hefty price tag attached to it on Android, but that's OK as the immense challenge it contains is likely to burn for longer than the sun. The first Baldur's game, this faithful reworking of the 1998 classic also includes several of the PC game's post-release expansion packs, just in case the standard 60-hour marathon quest isn't hardcore enough for you.

49. Super Crossfighter (£1.18, $1.99, $AUD2.99)

Super Crossfighter

Developer Radiangames has done it again with Super Crossfighter, using its trademark red/blue/sci-fi visuals to reinterpret a classic genre. This time it's refreshed the Space Invaders concept, jazzing it up both visually and technically, by allowing players to flip their attacking craft up to the top of the screen for literally twice the alien-attacking action on the one screen. Watch the trailer; if your heart doesn't start pumping a bit quicker you're quite obviously dead.

50. Final Fantasy VI (£10.99, US$15.99, AU$19.99)

Final Fantasy VI

At time of writing, Square Enix's Android remakes of the Final Fantasy series only go up to Final Fantasy VI, which is probably just as well as we think the world may well explode should FF VII ever appear on Android. But chapter VI of the RPG series is almost as good an experience, offering a vast quest and the usual hours of unrelenting storytelling.








Xbox One to play catch up with Plus7

Xbox One to play catch up with Plus7

Xbox and Yahoo7 are partnering up to give Xbox One users a custom Plus7 app with catch-up TV content from Channel 7 starting September 3.

Currently, the Plus7 app can be accessed through web, mobile and tablet (iOS and Android), providing content from Yahoo!7 channels Seven, 7mate and 7TWO, as well as from other content partners.

Interestingly, Plus7 has so far only turned up on the PlayStation 3 while the Xbox 360 got a miss. There's also no word yet if the app will turn up on the PS4.

Content, everywhere

With the launch of FreeviewPlus set for tomorrow, the availability of catch-up TV services through a number of devices has only been increasing.

Yahoo7's Director of Product and Audience, Caroline Casey, said that the company is focused on making its "available wherever and whenever users want".

For Xbox, the inclusion of the service will allow it to help the Xbox One deliver more than just games.

"With Xbox One, we set out to create an all-in-one solution built for the future that not only has the best games, but the best entertainment and TV experiences together in one place," said Jeremy Hinton, Xbox Lead for Microsoft Australia.

"We are excited to welcome Plus7 into our great line-up of local and international content available on Xbox One."


UPDATED: PS4 vs Xbox One: which is better?

UPDATED: PS4 vs Xbox One: which is better?

Introduction and design

Update: Our PS4 vs Xbox One comparison considers Microsoft's price drop and how it contrasts with Sony's specs, games and graphics power headed into the holidays.

Like it or not, almost ten months into this PS4 vs Xbox One comparison, sales have proven that Sony is more popular with early adopters of the next-generation of video games.

PlayStation 4 has surpassed 10 million units sold worldwide, while Microsoft's latest figures numbers to date indicate just 5 million Xbox One systems have sold.

But those are sales statistics, meaningless when you consider the Xbox One price drop finally made the debate a little more even. In fact, without Kinect, consumers' interest in the new Xbox doubled.

Microsoft is mounting a come-from-behind campaign, adding more "Only on Xbox" games to its library this year to join must-have next-gen exclusive Titanfall. It also has the sole console with EA Access.

Sony, meanwhile, is preparing PS4 for a streaming and virtual reality future with PlayStation Now and Oculus Rift-challenger Project Morpheus. Games like Uncharted 4 and The Order 1886 are set for 2015.

Of course, both companies claim to have the advantage in powering gamers through the next decade. To see if that's true, our Xbox One vs PS4 comparison needs an update.

FutTv : k2J1D34XTbE72

Xbox One vs PS4 hardware design

Deciding between PS4 and Xbox One is like peeling back an onion, and it starts with the outermost layer, the hardware design.

Xbox One's dimensions make it a menacing gaming beast that measures 13.5 in x 10.4 in x 3.2 in. It's also riddled with vents as to not overheat for another Red Ring of Death scenario.

Xbox One dimensions

It towers over every other device (though Microsoft advises not to stand it up vertically), and completely dwarfs our smallest home theater gadget, the app-filled Chromecast.

PS4 has a more distinctive angular shape with an overall stylish design. This half-matte half-gloss console measures a slimmer 10.8 in x 12 in x 2 in at its widest regions.

These dimensions make Sony's machine more media cabinet-friendly, at least next to Xbox One. The new Xbox also weighs a heftier 3.56 kg vs PS4's 2.75 kg.

PS4 dimensions

PS4 has the advantage of hiding ports too, though as we illustrated in our video comparison, this can actually make it harder to plug cables into the back of the system.

In this way, Xbox One represents functionality over form. A lot of the internal specs are comparable, but Microsoft and Sony really diverged when it came to the designs of Xbox One and PS4.

That may matter since you're buying into an expensive console that's going to sit front and center in your living room entertainment system for the next ten years.

The future of gaming, in association with O2 Guru

YouTube : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uq4uCoo1Q-0

Xbox One vs PS4 front and rear ports

More clear cut is the wireless connectivity situation. PS4 makes room for gigabit ethernet and 802.11 WiFi bands b/g/n, while Xbox One includes all of that plus the older 802.11a band.

Xbox One also supports both the 2.4GHz and newer 5GHz channels that are compatible with dual band routers. PS4 limits connections to 2.4GHz, which is likely to have more interference.

Both systems have 500GB hard drives, but only PS4 allows user-replaceable internal drives. An Xbox One teardown found a standard-looking drive inside, but replacing it voids the warranty.

Instead, the Xbox One June update finally allowed gamers to add external storage to the monster-sized system. There are strings attached. The drive needs to be 256GB or larger and USB 3.0.

External storage isn't an option that Sony supports in its "go big or go home" internal approach.

PS4 vs Xbox One rear ports

PS4 and Xbox One are void of remarkable characteristics on the front. There's a Blu-ray/DVD combo drive to the left and their respective, muted-color logos to the right. PS3 has a pair of USB ports tucked between its sandwich-like halves next to where the disc drive is located.

It's all around back for Xbox One. That's where it has two USB ports (a third port is on the side), HDMI in, HDMI out, S/PDIF for digital audio, a proprietary Xbox One Kinect port, an IR blaster connection and an Ethernet port. To the far right is a K-lock in case you want to lug this system around to LAN parties.

Sony went with a minimalist approach when it came to PS4's rear ports. You'll only find an HDMI out, S/PDIF, Ethernet and PS4 camera port (marked "AUX") around back.

Xbox One is more feature-packed in this area thanks to its HDMI in and IR blaster connections used for its TV cable or satellite box functionality. PS4 lacks this passthrough technology, opting to stick with gaming as its top priority.

Specs

Xbox One graphics specs teardown

Is PS4 or Xbox more powerful?

PS4 and Xbox One multiply the power of Xbox 360 and PS3. More importantly, they were built with smarter internal designs, drawing from mistakes of last-generation consoles.

Chip manufacturer AMD benefitted the most from these upgrades. Xbox One has a custom 1.75GHz AMD 8-core CPU, a last-minute upgrade over its original 1.6GHz processor.

The PS4 CPU remained clocked at 1.6GHz and contains a similar custom AMD 8-core CPU with x86 based architecture.

This represents a roughly 10% increase in processing power for Xbox One, but the opposite is true when it comes to the all-important graphics processor.

PS4 graphics specs teardown

PS4 boasts a 1.84 teraflop GPU that's based on AMD's Radeon technology. The Xbox One graphics chip, also with an AMD Radeon GPU, has a pipeline for 1.31 teraflops.

Microsoft claims that as of June's Xbox One update, Kinect-free games can reclaim 10% of the GPU that was reserved for system level processing like Kinect-related skeletal tracking data. But developers still have to take advantage of this cache in new games or patch titles.

Right now, the PS4 specs make room for faster graphics rendering than Xbox One, especially when combined with Sony's choice in superior system memory.

FutTv : RIRhQQQ48P7yD

Best PS4 vs Xbox One specs for RAM

Even more controversial is the memory under the consoles' matte black hoods. It's not the amount of RAM at issue - both are future-proofed with 8GB of RAM - it's the type used.

PS4 has a distinct advantage with faster 8GB GDDR5 memory, while Xbox One went with the slower bandwidth of the 8GB DDR3 variety. But, wait, there's more to it.

Neither system allocates all of that RAM to game developers - some is reserved to run their operating systems.

PS4 reserves up to 3.5GB for its operating system, leaving developers with 4.5GB, according to documentation. They can sometimes access an extra 1GB of "flexible" memory when it's available, but that's not guaranteed.

Xbox One's "guaranteed memory" amounts to a slightly higher 5GB for developers, as Microsoft's multi-layered operating system takes up a steady 3GB. It eeks out a 0.5GB win with more developer-accessible memory than PS4, unless you factor in Sony's 1GB of "flexible" memory at times. Then it's 0.5GB less.

The PS4 and Xbox One specs have similar AMD architecture at their core, but contrast like apples and oranges when it comes to memory. Only developers can determine how this battle is won.

Graphics comparison

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMsr_EzXLFQ

PS4 vs Xbox One graphics comparison

Putting all of these specs to the test, developers have had months to build and demo games to us. We're finally seeing the side-by-side results.

The graphics comparison between multi-console games, like the recently released Metal Gear Solid 5: Ground Zeros, have given us the best PS4 vs Xbox One graphics benchmarks.

A gameplay video on YouTube of MGS5: Ground Zeros pans between the four versions of the game with a definitive answer.

The conclusion is that there's slightly more clarity to the PS4 version. Specifically, more distant textures and moving objects appear softer among the otherwise identical Xbox One visuals.

It's a trend we're seeing from PS4 games that achieve a 1080p resolution at 30 or 60 frames per second when their Xbox One counterparts run at 720p or 900p at 30 or 60fps.

Watch Dogs is just one game that has a higher resolution on PS4 vs Xbox One

That's the case with Assassin's Creed, Call of Duty: Ghosts, The Witcher 2 and Thief. It's even more evident in Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition where it's 60fps on PS4 vs 30fps on Xbox One.

Battlefield 4 is one of the few PS4 games with a native resolution of 900p. Alas, it was still just 720p on Xbox One. Not that it matters. Both versions were plagued with glitches for months.

This is in no way a deal-breaker for the Xbox One, and here's why. First, it's almost impossible to tell the difference without a side-by-side comparison.

Second, everyone's hopeful that as developers mature with these two new consoles, the gap will close and games on both systems will prove what next-generation gaming is all about.

DirectX12 could make that a reality, with Microsoft promising a preview version of its Direct3D 12 graphics toolset by the end of the year. It could make up for the slower DDR3 RAM.

Third, the differences are more noticeable in the Xbox One and PS4 graphics comparisons that include Xbox 360 and PS3. Both Microsoft and Sony leave their last-generation graphics chip architecture and RAM limitations behind, and it shows.

Price

Xbox One vs PS4 price difference

It's expensive to be an early adopter, and the PS4 and Xbox One prices proves just that in each of the countries the systems have launched.

The PS4 price was the more tempting deal at launch: $399 for the console and DualShock 4 controller. Xbox One was more expensive at $499 for the system, Xbox One controller and Kinect.

Xbox One vs PS4 price

An official Xbox One price drop has made this comparison a moot point going forward. The new list price is $399 without Kinect included.

That's the same price as the PS4 in the US and UK and, in an appropriately backwards move, actually cheaper in Oz. PS4 still costs AU$549 there.

The price difference gave Sony an early lead at face value, and gamers didn't seem to mind that the PS4 camera was a separate purchase. It's also the only console of the two available in countries like India, Japan and Turkey until later this month.

What's Included

What's in the box?

There's more value in the Xbox One Kinect bundle, accounting for some of the original price difference, so it's important to dive deeper into what's included and, of course, what's not included in the box.

At launch, Xbox Ones came with the console, a controller. and the Kinect camera. These systems also had "Day One 2013" emblazoned on the cardboard box and at the center of the controller.

That's a nice perk for Xbox loyalists, though not worth the premium they paid. Subsequent Xbox One bundles included Titanfall for the same price, while newer, cheaper systems make Kinect optional.

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All Xbox One boxes contains an HDMI cable, wired mono headset and stingy 14-day free trial for Microsoft's Xbox Live Gold online service. There's no USB charging cable, as the Xbox One controller uses batteries out-of-the-box.

Inside the PS4 box is the console and one DualShock 4 controller. Wires include an HDMI cable (Sony learned its lesson after backlash for not including one with the PS3) and a micro-USB cable for the controller.

Don't throw out the box right away. Tucked inside is a 30-day subscription to PlayStation Plus and a wired mono earbud, contrasting with the just-a-cheap Xbox One headset.

The price difference between the PS4 and Xbox One was a sticking point for gamers over the lasts seven months. Microsoft reshaped the argument at E3 2014 with price-matched Kinect-free Xbox One. The question is, will gamers bite?

Controller and cameras

Xbox One vs PS4 controller

The controllers

The most important aspects of the PS4 vs Xbox One controller comparison include comfort, size and battery life, but a lot of this is going to come down to personal preference.

The good news is that both conform to your hands better vs the less ergonomic Xbox 360 and PS3 versions.

The Xbox One vs Xbox 360 gamepad comparison illustrates some of the 40 design innovations like a tweaked D-Pad and extra rumble effect via "Impulse Triggers" in the shoulder buttons.

Our PS4 vs PS3 gamepad comparison shows even bigger improvements thanks to the fact that the DualShock 4 is larger this time around. Its handles are easier to grip in long gameplay sessions and its dual analog sticks have a recessed divot. Precision movement is now easier.

The PS4 controller's front touchpad and mono speaker are a unique way to interact with games, and developers are starting to find ways to adopt this technology into their controls schemes.

Which controller is better? There's a lot of satisfaction with the PS4 gamepad, but that may have more to do with people's surprise at how much more comfortable the DualShock 4 is compared to the DualShock 3. That wow factor may wear away soon.

The Xbox One vs PS4 controller comparison ends up being a matter of opinion. Some gamers are accustomed to Sony's parallel dual analog sticks, while plenty of others opt for offset analog sticks that have been part of the Xbox universe since the beginning.

kinect vs ps4 camera

Xbox One Kinect vs PS4 Camera

A robust games list for Xbox One Kinect and PS4 Camera has been slow to materialize, even though Microsoft and Sony insisted on sticking with controller-free camera inputs.

The good news is that the new Kinect technology is promising, tracking up to six skeletons at once and processing 2GB of data per second. It can pick up heart rates, facial expressions and 25 joints, thumbs included.

The camera's 60% wider field of vision compared to the Xbox 360 Kinect remedies the annoying "stand 6 feet away" error messages we experienced last time around.

Xbox One Kinect is certainly powerful, it just needs more games. Right now, there are few reasons to keep the 1080p camera plugged in.

Kinect was good on paper, now it just wears a paper dunce cap

There's a free Kinect Sports Rivals demo that's fun, and the full version just came out. It also supports two Xbox-exclusive workout games, Just Dance 2014 and upcoming Harmonix titles Fantasia: Music Evolved and Dance Central Spotlight. Fighter Within, though, is far from playable.

PS4 doesn't have as much to offer at this point either, but it's hard to find in stock. Formerly called the PlayStation Eye, it features two 1280x800px cameras in a body that's slimmer than the Kinect.

Unfortunately, the PS4 Camera games list is also slimmer. The included robot mini-game The Playroom has been updated since the console launch, but little else besides Just Dance 2014 requires the device.

In the future, Project Morpheus will utilize the PS4 Camera for virtual reality, but the a long-off prospect of VR games doesn't really explain why the camera is often sold out.

Best games

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0mF0O3XxjA

The best PS4 and Xbox One games

The PS4 and Xbox One games list is still under 100 and only a few of the new releases stand as exclusives that make deciding between the two matter.

The aforementioned Titanfall stands above all others if you're into playing Call of Duty-style first-person shooters in which you double jump with a jetpack, wall-run and hop into a giant mech.

Xbox One launch titles Dead Rising 3 and Ryse: Son of Rome provided over-the-top action early on, and Forza Motorsport 5 was the only first-party racing game at launch of either console.

Call of Duty: Ghosts, while not exclusive to Xbox One, has downloadable content (DLC) that is going to be a timed-exclusive (by a month) held over PS4 gamers' heads. The same Xbox first policy applies to Call of Duty: Advance Warfighter.

CoD Xbox One vs PS4

Xbox One games in development include the Halo 5: Guardians, the next Gears of War game, Quantum Break, Sunset Overdrive and LittleBigPlanet-like Project Spark.

PS4 exclusive Infamous: Second Son couldn't match the groundswell of attention generated by the Titanfall beta, but it's superpower-filled gameplay is nonetheless entertaining.

Killzone: Shadow and Knack are the two Sony-made games that released on discs at launch, but the console is benefiting most from remakes like The Last of Us and digitally distributed indie games.

Resogun and Mercenary Kings were really driving up the points for PlayStation Plus in our book. They were free in April with a subscription to the Sony's paid service.

Further out, we're looking forward to The Order 1886, Uncharted 4 and The Witness the most. DriveClub is also still on our radar after being delayed from the PS4 launch lineup.

Xbox One Kinect vs PS4 Eye

Indie games on PS4 and Xbox One

Our most-wanted PS4 games list doesn't end there because Sony got out in front of supporting independent game developers.

Octodad: Dadliest Catch from Young Horses and Transistor from Supergiant Games came to Sony's console in April and May. Outlast from Red Barrels Studio made the PC-to-PS4 transition in February.

At first, Microsoft maintained that Xbox One games would need to be fronted by a publisher. That changed when the company announced that it would allow self-published games and, in the future, every console would act as a developer kit.

We're still waiting on this "free Xbox One dev kit," a potential game-changer when PS4 developer kits cost thousands of dollars. Until that shift happens, Sony has the attention of the indie developer crowd thanks to its early lead.

Apps and backward compatibility

When it comes to apps, Xbox One is in the ever-so-slight lead

Xbox One vs PS4 apps

The Xbox 360 and PS3 proved to be more than just gaming machines and Xbox One and PS4 are no different. Of course, most are shared across both platforms.

All gamers have access to Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, Hulu Plus, Crackle, Vudu and Redbox Instant along with baseball season newcomer MLB.TV.

Xbox One corners the app-filled market with ESPN, Fox Now, FX Now, NFL, Ted, The CW, Twitch, Univision Deportes, Verizon FiOS TV and YouTube. It also has Microsoft's own Internet Explorer, OneDrive, Skype and Xbox Music and Xbox Video services.

That contrasts with PS4. Sony's console features Crunchyroll, Epix, NBA Game Time, NHL GameCenter Live, YuppTV, the WWE Network and the free music video playing app VidZone.

More niche apps are expected as time goes on, so this is hardly the final list of apps for Xbox One and PS4. We're still waiting for a proper next-generation version of HBO Go, with the PS4 app said to be in the development now.

FutTv : Gg7iOIQoN8maZ

Are Xbox One vs PS4 backward compatible?

Sony and Microsoft keep teasing the ability to bring old games to their new systems in a variety of ways, but we're still waiting for Xbox One and PS4 backward compatibility.

Right now, Sony's PlayStation Now is in public beta and it costs money to rent games like The Last of Us, God of War: Ascension, Dead Space 3 and Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes on the PS4.

Sony plans to expand its Gaikai-based video game streaming service to PS2, PS Vita and even Bravia TVs, and then adds PlayStation and PS2 to the PS3-only lineup.

Microsoft could take the same route with Xbox One backward compatibility. The company is working on Xbox 360 emulation for the newer console, but doesn't have plans to bring it to fruition right now.

None of these options are foolproof yet. That means you'll need to keep your Xbox 360 and PS3 in order to replay Halo 4 and Uncharted 3. You can't sell the old systems, and that means people won't be able to readily buy them - they're more likely to purchase them directly from Microsoft and Sony.

Other PS4 and Xbox One differences

The look of the console, the feel of the controller and the appeal of the games list are the main differences from which consumers will decide on PS4 and Xbox One.

However, there are other factors at play one should consider before buying into a new system. It's a good idea to converse with friends, keeping mind of their potential bias.

Since there's no such thing as cross-platform multiplayer, you may be split up when playing Call of Duty on PS4 when all of your friends own it for Xbox One.

Both Microsoft and Sony are charging for multiplayer this console generation, whereas PS3 gamers got to log into matches Scott-Free.

Sony sadly moved closer to Microsoft in this way, while Microsoft moved closer to Sony by tearing down the Xbox Live app paywall. You no longer have to subscribe to stream Netflix and other apps.

Microsoft also supports MP3 and DLNA playback with the Xbox One, whereas Sony neglected to add such compatibility. It's promised to rectify that in a future firmware update, but hasn't supplied us with an update in several months.

The PS4 vs Xbox One comparison has evolved in the last ten months, mostly because Microsoft's plans have shifted, from Xbox One price drops to more lenient paywall policies to graphics specs upgrades.

These two next-generation consoles are now on a more even video game playing field, which means Sony and Microsoft are going to start throwing Uncharted 4 to Halo 5 Guardians at you, and that's a win for all gamers.

FutTv : 2jhE7e1D15j7l






Updated: PS4 vs Xbox One: which is better?

Updated: PS4 vs Xbox One: which is better?

Introduction and design

Update: Our PS4 vs Xbox One comparison considers Microsoft's price drop and how it contrasts with Sony's specs, games and graphics power headed into the holidays.

Like it or not, almost ten months into this PS4 vs Xbox One comparison, sales have proven that Sony is more popular with early adopters of the next-generation of video games.

PlayStation 4 has surpassed 10 million units sold worldwide, while Microsoft's latest numbers indicate just 5 million Xbox One systems have sold.

But those are sales statistics, meaningless when you consider the Xbox One price drop finally made the debate a little more even. In fact, without Kinect, consumers' interest in the new Xbox doubled.

Microsoft is mounting a come-from-behind campaign, adding more "Only on Xbox" games to its library this year to join must-have next-gen exclusive Titanfall. It also has the sole console with EA Access.

Sony, meanwhile, is preparing PS4 for a streaming and virtual reality future with PlayStation Now and Oculus Rift-challenger Project Morpheus. Games like Uncharted 4 and The Order 1886 are set for 2015.

Of course, both companies claim to have the advantage in powering gamers through the next decade. To see if that's true, our Xbox One vs PS4 comparison needs an update.

FutTv : k2J1D34XTbE72

Xbox One vs PS4 hardware design

Deciding between PS4 and Xbox One is like peeling back an onion, and it starts with the outermost layer, the hardware design.

Xbox One's dimensions make it a menacing gaming beast that measures 13.5 in x 10.4 in x 3.2 in. It's also riddled with vents as to not overheat for another Red Ring of Death scenario.

Xbox One dimensions

It towers over every other device (though Microsoft advises not to stand it up vertically), and completely dwarfs our smallest home theater gadget, the app-filled Chromecast.

PS4 has a more distinctive angular shape with an overall stylish design. This half-matte half-gloss console measures a slimmer 10.8 in x 12 in x 2 in at its widest regions.

These dimensions make Sony's machine more media cabinet-friendly, at least next to Xbox One. The new Xbox also weighs a heftier 3.56 kg vs PS4's 2.75 kg.

PS4 dimensions

PS4 has the advantage of hiding ports too, though as we illustrated in our video comparison, this can actually make it harder to plug cables into the back of the system.

In this way, Xbox One represents functionality over form. A lot of the internal specs are comparable, but Microsoft and Sony really diverged when it came to the designs of Xbox One and PS4.

That may matter since you're buying into an expensive console that's going to sit front and center in your living room entertainment system for the next ten years.

Xbox One vs PS4 front and rear ports

More clear cut is the wireless connectivity situation. PS4 makes room for gigabit ethernet and 802.11 WiFi bands b/g/n, while Xbox One includes all of that plus the older 802.11a band.

Xbox One also supports both the 2.4GHz and newer 5GHz channels that are compatible with dual band routers. PS4 limits connections to 2.4GHz, which is likely to have more interference.

Both systems have 500GB hard drives, but only PS4 allows user-replaceable internal drives. An Xbox One teardown found a standard-looking drive inside, but replacing it voids the warranty.

Instead, the Xbox One June update finally allowed gamers to add external storage to the monster-sized system. There are strings attached. The drive needs to be 256GB or larger and USB 3.0.

External storage isn't an option that Sony supports in its "go big or go home" internal approach.

PS4 vs Xbox One rear ports

PS4 and Xbox One are void of remarkable characteristics on the front. There's a Blu-ray/DVD combo drive to the left and their respective, muted-color logos to the right. PS3 has a pair of USB ports tucked between its sandwich-like halves next to where the disc drive is located.

It's all around back for Xbox One. That's where it has two USB ports (a third port is on the side), HDMI in, HDMI out, S/PDIF for digital audio, a proprietary Xbox One Kinect port, an IR blaster connection and an Ethernet port. To the far right is a K-lock in case you want to lug this system around to LAN parties.

Sony went with a minimalist approach when it came to PS4's rear ports. You'll only find an HDMI out, S/PDIF, Ethernet and PS4 camera port (marked "AUX") around back.

Xbox One is more feature-packed in this area thanks to its HDMI in and IR blaster connections used for its TV cable or satellite box functionality. PS4 lacks this passthrough technology, opting to stick with gaming as its top priority.

Specs

Xbox One has a non-replaceable internal hard drive

Is PS4 or Xbox more powerful?

PS4 and Xbox One multiply the power of Xbox 360 and PS3. More importantly, they were built with smarter internal designs, drawing from mistakes of last-generation consoles.

Chip manufacturer AMD benefitted the most from these upgrades. Xbox One has a custom 1.75GHz AMD 8-core CPU, a last-minute upgrade over its original 1.6GHz processor.

The PS4 CPU remained clocked at 1.6GHz and contains a similar custom AMD 8-core CPU with x86 based architecture.

This represents a roughly 10% increase in processing power for Xbox One, but the opposite is true when it comes to the all-important graphics processor.

PS4 teardown specs

PS4 boasts a 1.84 teraflop GPU that's based on AMD's Radeon technology. The Xbox One graphics chip, also with an AMD Radeon GPU, has a pipeline for 1.31 teraflops.

Microsoft claims that as of June's Xbox One update, Kinect-free games canreclaim 10% of the GPU that was reserved for system level processing like Kinect-related skeletal tracking data. But developers still have to take advantage of this cache in new games or patch titles.

Right now, the PS4 specs make room for faster graphics rendering than Xbox One, especially when combined with Sony's choice in superior system memory.

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Best PS4 vs Xbox One specs for RAM

Even more controversial is the memory under the consoles' matte black hoods. It's not the amount of RAM at issue - both are future-proofed with 8GB of RAM - it's the type used.

PS4 has a distinct advantage with faster 8GB GDDR5 memory, while Xbox One went with the slower bandwidth of the 8GB DDR3 variety. But, wait, there's more to it.

Neither system allocates all of that RAM to game developers - some is reserved to run their operating systems.

PS4 reserves up to 3.5GB for its operating system, leaving developers with 4.5GB, according to documentation. They can sometimes access an extra 1GB of "flexible" memory when it's available, but that's not guaranteed.

Xbox One's "guaranteed memory" amounts to a slightly higher 5GB for developers, as Microsoft's multi-layered operating system takes up a steady 3GB. It eeks out a 0.5GB win with more developer-accessible memory than PS4, unless you factor in Sony's 1GB of "flexible" memory at times. Then it's 0.5GB less.

The PS4 and Xbox One specs have similar AMD architecture at their core, but contrast like apples and oranges when it comes to memory. Only developers can determine how this battle is won.

Graphics comparison

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMsr_EzXLFQ

PS4 vs Xbox One graphics comparison

Putting all of these specs to the test, developers have had months to build and demo games to us. We're finally seeing the side-by-side results.

The graphics comparison between multi-console games, like the recently released Metal Gear Solid 5: Ground Zeros, have given us the best PS4 vs Xbox One graphics benchmarks.

A gameplay video on YouTube of MGS5: Ground Zeros pans between the four versions of the game with a definitive answer.

The conclusion is that there's slightly more clarity to the PS4 version. Specifically, more distant textures and moving objects appear softer among the otherwise identical Xbox One visuals.

It's a trend we're seeing from PS4 games that achieve a 1080p resolution at 30 or 60 frames per second when their Xbox One counterparts run at 720p or 900p at 30 or 60fps.

Xbox One vs PS4 graphics comparison

That's the case with Assassin's Creed, Call of Duty: Ghosts, The Witcher 2 and Thief. It's even more evident in Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition where it's 60fps on PS4 vs 30fps on Xbox One.

Battlefield 4 is one of the few PS4 games with a native resolution of 900p. Alas, it was still just 720p on Xbox One. Not that it matters. Both versions were plagued with glitches for months.

This is in no way a deal-breaker for the Xbox One, and here's why. First, it's almost impossible to tell the difference without a side-by-side comparison.

Second, everyone's hopeful that as developers mature with these two new consoles, the gap will close and games on both systems will prove what next-generation gaming is all about.

DirectX12 could make that a reality, with Microsoft promising a preview version of its Direct3D 12 graphics toolset by the end of the year. It could make up for the slower DDR3 RAM.

Third, the differences are more noticeable in the Xbox One and PS4 graphics comparisons that include Xbox 360 and PS3. Both Microsoft and Sony leave their last-generation graphics chip architecture and RAM limitations behind, and it shows.

Price

Xbox One vs PS4 price difference

It's expensive to be an early adopter, and the PS4 and Xbox One prices proves just that in each of the countries the systems have launched.

The PS4 price was the more tempting deal at launch: £349 for the console and DualShock 4 controller. Xbox One was more expensive at $499 for the system, Xbox One controller and Kinect.

Xbox One vs PS4 price

An official Xbox One price drop has made this comparison a moot point going forward. The new list price is £349 without Kinect included.

That's the same price as the PS4 UK and US and, in an appropriately backwards move, actually cheaper in Oz. Xbx One now costs AU$499, while PS4 still costs AU$549 there.

The price difference gave Sony an early lead at face value, and gamers didn't seem to mind that the PS4 camera was a separate purchase. It's also the only console of the two available in countries like India, Japan and Turkey until September.

What's Included

What's in the box?

There's more value in the Xbox One Kinect bundle, accounting for some of the original price difference, so it's important to dive deeper into what's included and, of course, what's not included in the box.

At launch, Xbox Ones came with the console, a controller. and the Kinect camera. These systems also had "Day One 2013" emblazoned on the cardboard box and at the center of the controller.

That's a nice perk for Xbox loyalists, though not worth the premium they paid. Subsequent Xbox One bundles included Titanfall for the same price, while newer, cheaper systems make Kinect optional.

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All Xbox One boxes contains an HDMI cable, wired mono headset and stingy 14-day free trial for Microsoft's Xbox Live Gold online service. There's no USB charging cable, as the Xbox One controller uses batteries out-of-the-box.

Inside the PS4 box is the console and one DualShock 4 controller. Wires include an HDMI cable (Sony learned its lesson after backlash for not including one with the PS3) and a micro-USB cable for the controller.

Don't throw out the box right away. Tucked inside is a 30-day subscription to PlayStation Plus and a wired mono earbud, contrasting with the just-a-cheap Xbox One headset.

The price difference between the PS4 and Xbox One was a sticking point for gamers over the lasts seven months. Microsoft reshaped the argument at E3 2014 with price-matched Kinect-free Xbox One. The question is, will gamers bite?

Controller and cameras

Xbox One vs PS4 controller

The controllers

The most important aspects of the PS4 vs Xbox One controller comparison include comfort, size and battery life, but a lot of this is going to come down to personal preference.

The good news is that both conform to your hands better vs the less ergonomic Xbox 360 and PS3 versions.

The Xbox One vs Xbox 360 gamepad comparison illustrates some of the 40 design innovations like a tweaked D-Pad and extra rumble effect via "Impulse Triggers" in the shoulder buttons.

Our PS4 vs PS3 gamepad comparison shows even bigger improvements thanks to the fact that the DualShock 4 is larger this time around. Its handles are easier to grip in long gameplay sessions and its dual analog sticks have a recessed divot. Precision movement is now easier.

The PS4 controller's front touchpad and mono speaker are a unique way to interact with games, and developers are starting to find ways to adopt this technology into their controls schemes.

Which controller is better? There's a lot of satisfaction with the PS4 gamepad, but that may have more to do with people's surprise at how much more comfortable the DualShock 4 is compared to the DualShock 3. That wow factor may wear away soon.

The Xbox One vs PS4 controller comparison ends up being a matter of opinion. Some gamers are accustomed to Sony's parallel dual analog sticks, while plenty of others opt for offset analog sticks that have been part of the Xbox universe since the beginning.

kinect vs ps4 camera

Xbox One Kinect vs PS4 Camera

A robust games list for Xbox One Kinect and PS4 Camera has been slow to materialize, even though Microsoft and Sony insisted on sticking with controller-free camera inputs.

The good news is that the new Kinect technology is promising, tracking up to six skeletons at once and processing 2GB of data per second. It can pick up heart rates, facial expressions and 25 joints, thumbs included.

The camera's 60% wider field of vision compared to the Xbox 360 Kinect remedies the annoying "stand 6 feet away" error messages we experienced last time around.

Xbox One Kinect is certainly powerful, it just needs more games. Right now, there are few reasons to keep the 1080p camera plugged in.

Xbox One Kinect games list

There's a free Kinect Sports Rivals demo that's fun, and the full version just came out. It also supports two Xbox-exclusive workout games, Just Dance 2014 and upcoming Harmonix titles Fantasia: Music Evolved and Dance Central Spotlight. Fighter Within, though, is far from playable.

PS4 doesn't have as much to offer at this point either, but it's hard to find in stock. Formerly called the PlayStation Eye, it features two 1280x800px cameras in a body that's slimmer than the Kinect.

Unfortunately, the PS4 Camera games list is also slimmer. The included robot mini-game The Playroom has been updated since the console launch, but little else besides Just Dance 2014 requires the device.

In the future, Project Morpheus will utilize the PS4 Camera for virtual reality, but the a long-off prospect of VR games doesn't really explain why the camera is often sold out.

Best games

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0mF0O3XxjA

The best PS4 and Xbox One games

The PS4 and Xbox One games list is still under 100 and only a few of the new releases stand as exclusives that make deciding between the two matter.

The aforementioned Titanfall stands above all others if you're into playing Call of Duty-style first-person shooters in which you double jump with a jetpack, wall-run and hop into a giant mech.

Xbox One launch titles Dead Rising 3 and Ryse: Son of Rome provided over-the-top action early on, and Forza Motorsport 5 was the only first-party racing game at launch of either console.

Call of Duty: Ghosts, while not exclusive to Xbox One, has downloadable content (DLC) that is going to be a timed-exclusive (by a month) held over PS4 gamers' heads. The same Xbox first policy applies to Call of Duty: Advance Warfighter.

CoD Advanced Warfighter

Xbox One games in development include the Halo 5: Guardians, the next Gears of War game, Quantum Break, Sunset Overdrive and LittleBigPlanet-like Project Spark.

PS4 exclusive Infamous: Second Son couldn't match the groundswell of attention generated by the Titanfall beta, but it's superpower-filled gameplay is nonetheless entertaining.

Killzone: Shadow and Knack are the two Sony-made games that released on discs at launch, but the console is benefiting most from remakes like The Last of Us and digitally distributed indie games.

Resogun and Mercenary Kings were really driving up the points for PlayStation Plus in our book. They were free in April with a subscription to the Sony's paid service.

Further out, we're looking forward to The Order 1886, Uncharted 4 and The Witness the most. DriveClub is also still on our radar after being delayed from the PS4 launch lineup.

Xbox One Kinect vs PS4 Eye

Indie games on PS4 and Xbox One

Our most-wanted PS4 games list doesn't end there because Sony got out in front of supporting independent game developers.

Octodad: Dadliest Catch from Young Horses and Transistor from Supergiant Games came to Sony's console in April and May. Outlast from Red Barrels Studio made the PC-to-PS4 transition in February.

At first, Microsoft maintained that Xbox One games would need to be fronted by a publisher. That changed when the company announced that it would allow self-published games and, in the future, every console would act as a developer kit.

We're still waiting on this "free Xbox One dev kit," a potential game-changer when PS4 developer kits cost thousands of dollars. Until that shift happens, Sony has the attention of the indie developer crowd thanks to its early lead.

Apps and backward compatibility

Xbox One vs PS4 apps

Xbox One vs PS4 apps

The Xbox 360 and PS3 proved to be more than just gaming machines and Xbox One and PS4 are no different. Of course, most are shared across both platforms.

In the UK, both systems share Netflix, Crackle, Amazon Instant Video (formerly Lovefilm) and Demand5.

Exclusive Xbox One apps include YouTube, Ted, Twitch and region-specific services like 4oD, Blinkbox, Eurosport, Muzu.tv, Sky's Now TV and Wuaki.tv. Microsoft-owned apps Internet Explorer, OneDrive, Skype and Xbox Music and Xbox Video are all here too.

That contrasts with PS4's UK app offering. Sony's console features BBC iPlayer, BBC Sports and BBC News, VidZone and Sony's Music Unlimited and Videos Unlimited services. More PS4 apps are expected this summer, including Sky Now TV and Sky Go.

In Australia, app-deprived gamers have access to VidZone and Quickflix and Sony's own apps. Xbox One delivers a better lineup: Crackle, MLB.TV, SBS ON DEMAND, Ted, TENplay, Twitch and YouTube as well as most of Microsoft's apps.

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Are Xbox One vs PS4 backward compatible?

Sony and Microsoft keep teasing the ability to bring old games to their new systems in a variety of ways, but we're still waiting for Xbox One and PS4 backward compatibility.

Right now, Sony has rolled out a PlayStation Now public beta in the US with streaming games like The Last of Us, God of War: Ascension, Dead Space 3 and Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes on the PS4.

Sony plans to expand its Gaikai-based video game streaming service to the UK in 2015. It'll also make the streaming software available on PS2, PS Vita and even Bravia TVs, and add PlayStation and PS2 games to the PS3-only lineup.

Microsoft could take the same route with Xbox One backward compatibility. The company is working on Xbox 360 emulation for the newer console, but doesn't have plans to bring it to fruition right now.

None of these options are here yet. That means you'll need to keep your Xbox 360 and PS3 in order to replay Halo 4 and Uncharted 3. You can't sell the old systems, and that means people won't be able to readily buy them - they're more likely to purchase them directly from Microsoft and Sony.

Other PS4 and Xbox One differences

The look of the console, the feel of the controller and the appeal of the games list are the main differences from which consumers will decide on PS4 and Xbox One.

However, there are other factors at play one should consider before buying into a new system. It's a good idea to converse with friends, keeping mind of their potential bias.

Since there's no such thing as cross-platform multiplayer, you may be split up when playing Call of Duty on PS4 when all of your friends own it for Xbox One.

Both Microsoft and Sony are charging for multiplayer this console generation, whereas PS3 gamers got to log into matches Scott-Free.

Sony sadly moved closer to Microsoft in this way, while Microsoft moved closer to Sony by tearing down the Xbox Live app paywall. You no longer have to subscribe to stream Netflix and other apps.

Microsoft also supports MP3 and DLNA playback with the Xbox One, whereas Sony neglected to add such compatibility. It's promised to rectify that in a future firmware update, but hasn't supplied us with an update in several months.

The PS4 vs Xbox One comparison has evolved in the last ten months, mostly because Microsoft's plans have shifted, from Xbox One price drops to more lenient paywall policies to graphics specs upgrades.

These two next-generation consoles are now on a more even video game playing field, which means Sony and Microsoft are going to start throwing Uncharted 4 to Halo 5 Guardians at you, and that's a win for all gamers.

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Week in Gaming: New 3DS models, Super Smash Bros fever, and Super Meat Boy Forever

Week in Gaming: New 3DS models, Super Smash Bros fever, and Super Meat Boy Forever

Rumour has it that Nintendo president Satoru Iwata is a big Week in Gaming fan. There's nothing he likes to do more on a Saturday morning than chow down on some lovely big bananas and read through TechRadar's pick of the gaming crop.

And rumour has it that, having realised how humdrum the gaming news had been this week, he decided to reveal two new designs for the 3DS and 3DS XL on Friday - just for us. Thanks Iwata!

And what do these new handhelds add? A faster processor, new trigger buttons, a better screen, and most importantly, a new directional nubbin. The only downside is that some new games, such as the upcoming Xenoblade Chronicles, will be incompatible with the existing versions.

3DS

Other than that we're pretty damn pleased with Nintendo's new handhelds, but we'll be waiting a while to get our hands on them: the new designs will launch in Japan on October 11, but won't reach here until 2015.

Oh, and while we're on the subject, Nintendo's American president (and TechRadar hero) Reggie Fils-Aime did the ALS ice bucket challenge - and didn't nominate anyone after. Which means the ice bucket challenge is now over for everyone. That's it, done.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSK3u23pz4Q

Son of a twitch

Ok, we lied, there was some other important gaming news this week. Amazon announced it had bought Twitch, which is kind of a big deal - and a bit of a shock too: following numerous reports, we were led to believe that Google was in the final stages of making a deal with the streaming giant.

Why this is good news for gamers

The justin.tv spin-off has rocketed over the years thanks to a thriving fanbase, a lot of which has been aggravated by the Amazon buyout. But Amazon is no longer just an e-tailer, and while selling stuff might still be its bread and butter, the company is betting big on home entertainment and gaming right now. Twitch.tv falls into that plan quite perfectly.

Or is it bad news? Arrrgggh!

Twitch

The cynic inside us worries that Amazon recommendations might start creeping into the service, but the optimist sees an opportunity to build its presence in gaming alongside its own studio (announced earlier this year), as well as building a serious YouTube rival. And Twitch, in turn, gets access to the Amazon bank vault.

So yes, while it's a shame to see another growing swooped up by one of the big dogs, we'll remain hopeful that Twitch will only be all the better for it.

Incidentally, these 'Twitch plays' are getting really out of hand.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcoJYZuuzO4

Smash and grab

Super Smash Bros fever is sweeping the office as Nintendo continues to drip-feed us like the hype hamsters we are. This week the treat was a medley of music tracks from the upcoming brawler, including the one below. TUNE.

YouTube : www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORXonp2lc0g

Nintendo also revealed the next character in the lineup of fighters, Shulk of Xenoblade Chronicles fame. This adds more credence to an earlier character roster "leak". We won't spoil anything here, but if you really want to know who else might be joining the party, CVG has the skinny.

Nice to meat you

Team Meat, creators of Super Meat Boy, has been teasing a new project - and it's just revealed that project is an endless runner called A Voyeur for September.

All was announced at PAX this week, where attendees were able to play a demo of the endless platformer. The game is actually based on Super Meat Boy, maintaining the same art style and gameplay, but will be available on phones and tablets as well as Steam.

Unfortunately the name isn't an indicator of its release date. A Voyeur for September is just an anagram of Super Meat Boy. The game will be out "when it's done". [CVG]